The development of the space capsule which will carry our astronaut up to and above the karman line and into space is progressing. The space capsule which will be lifted by the Spica rocket to an altitude of over one hundred kilometers, or sixty two miles, will contain all systems necessary to enable it to not only bring the astronaut into space, but also bring him, or her, safely back to earth.


Published by Rasmus Agdestein on

3 Comments

Kasey · 3rd April 2018 at 4:18 pm

I was wondering three things
1. How will you abort in the event of a failure
2. What kind of heat shielding will you use
3. How will you direct said heat shield in the right direction.

    Jacob Larsen · 8th April 2018 at 10:32 pm

    Hi Kasey,

    1. How will you abort in the event of a failure.
    The answer to that question is as wide as the range of failure modes we could experience. It would likely be something along the lines of “cut engine power, detach capsule, deploy stabilization mechanisms, slow down and pop chutes”.

    2. What kind of heat shielding will you use
    This is still not decided. Re-entry from a suborbital trip is much less breaking/slowing down, so an ablative heat shield could be a strong candidate.

    3. How will you direct said heat shield in the right direction.
    We’re going to try to make the capsule passively stable. In that case, the heat shield would always face the heat.

bernhard · 17th April 2018 at 1:46 am

One thing I wonder. Are there any plans for a launch ecape system which includes small rocket motors to eject the capsule in case of fire during fueling or explosion in the first seconds of launch?

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